Boiled Scrambled Eggs

I'm all about eggs. I love finding different ways to cook them. I ran across this today, which looked like a great idea, and it ties into my earlier mention of an egg dish called Fried Water, which also cooks eggs in boiling water.

here's a  link to an article about it.

The recipe itself is deceptively simple:

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Boiled Scrambled Eggs

Serves 2

4 large eggs, as fresh as possible
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Unsalted butter

In a bowl, beat the eggs until well-blended, about 30 seconds. (Tester’s Note: For lighter scrambled eggs, crack each egg into a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl; a little bit of the watery egg white will drip out. Discard it, rinse the strainer, and set over your sink.) 

In a medium pot of water, heat four or more inches of water to a low boil over medium heat. Add a few large pinches of salt.

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I tried this today but was not successful. I waited the 20 seconds for the eggs to set, but I think my stove couldn't maintain a hot enough temperature, because they ended up almost half not cooked. Next time I I'll probably wait 40 seconds. Or maybe I'll have a new stove by then. Anyway, you're mileage may vary.

I ended up microwaving my experiment to finish them off, and even microwaved they were good, and I could see the custard effect that the recipe tried to achieve.

I'll try this again.


why not just shir them in the shell?  I'll find you a recipe for shirred eggs. 

Not the recipe I was after but this is what google returns.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/bakedeggs_8634


I can't find an online version of what I mean by 'shirred eggs'. It's an English way of boiling them: you carefully pierce one end with a needle, and stir the contents in the shell then soft-boil the egg. To serve, take the egg out of the water with a spoon, cool the shell quickly and pat dry.  You can remove the top (pierced) end of the shell or completely remove the shell and eat the scrambled contents with toast soldiers. 


It's quite an art to pierce the shell then using a darning needle or poultry  lacer, scramble contents without breaking the shell. As kids we used to spend days practising, in our vacation times. This is also a very old invalid food (17th/18th centuries) 


because it's not the same thing?

joanne said:

why not just shir them in the shell?



see editing above... cheese it's also not as much fun! 



joanne said:

It's quite an art to pierce the shell then using a darning needle or poultry  lacer, scramble contents without breaking the shell. As kids we used to spend days practising, in our vacation times. (17th/18th centuries) 

This is what I saw when I first read this....


isn't this kinda like a failed poached egg?  cheese 


which version? DB's - that's a bit what I was thinking. My baked recipe - well, I dunno, it's often got lots of yummy stuff with it. My in-the-shell version - depends on how it's done cheese


It doesn't sound like either version is like these. These are scrambled eggs placed directly into boiling water.

Not baked, not in the shell. A third way.

joanne said:

which version? DB's - that's a bit what I was thinking. My baked recipe - well, I dunno, it's often got lots of yummy stuff with it. My in-the-shell version - depends on how it's done cheese



Good NY Times story on cooking eggs:

How to make eggs


Have you tried "Cloud Eggs"? Not saying they sound good--just different! https://www.bonappetit.com/story/cloud-eggs-instagram-trend


The article mentions that for cooking you can use supermarket eggs, but for eggs cooked alone, you should buy locally sourced eggs because they taste much better.

Can anyone attest to that fact? Where does one get locally sourced eggs (apart from the occasional farmer's market.)?

Anyway, I'm all about finding tastier eggs.


BG9 said:

Good NY Times story on cooking eggs:

How to make eggs



hmm. Does Whole Foods carry local eggs?




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