Mexico Beach, Fla: what it means, what to do?

Elizabeth

Can people be relocated, can they let it go back to nature? Should they be able to rebuild where they were?  Should building codes be changed for all US coastal areas? Shouldn't government play a role in all this?


John

Gov't role is compromised by political contributions from builders/contractors. N.J. Coastal Area Protection Act is constantly under attack.


Note the development along the coast from Asbury Park to Sandy Hook.




yahooyahoo

In 2012, North Carolina tried to impose building restrictions on the coast and it was squashed by politicians.

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/north-carolina-sea-level-rise-hurricane-florence_us_5b985a87e4b0162f4731da0e

"In 2012, North Carolina legislators passed a bill that barred policymakers and developers from using up-to-date climate science to plan for rising sea levels on the state’s coast. Now Hurricane Florence threatens to cause a devastating storm surge that could put thousands of lives in danger and cost the state billions of dollars worth of damage."



callista

I think the imperfect answer is to restrict insurance to those properties. If the people who build/rebuild there are taking the huge financial risk that accompanies it, rather than taxpayers thru FEMA and higher insurance premiums across the board, there will be less demand. The imperfect part comes from the fact that those higher costs will mean only wealthy folk will be able to live near the water.


Elizabeth
callista said:
I think the imperfect answer is to restrict insurance to those properties. If the people who build/rebuild there are taking the huge financial risk that accompanies it, rather than taxpayers thru FEMA and higher insurance premiums across the board, there will be less demand. The imperfect part comes from the fact that those higher costs will mean only wealthy folk will be able to live near the water.

 True. It won't limit construction. I mean, driving and car ownership are regulated. Air travel is regulated. Metal detectors are regulation. Entering buildings is often regulated. There could just be police enforcement. In many areas along shoreline you aren't even allowed to walk in areas. It seems code regulators could work with police and/or state regulators and DEPs to keep construction out.


Komarovsky
peaceinourtime said:


callista said:
I think the imperfect answer is to restrict insurance to those properties. If the people who build/rebuild there are taking the huge financial risk that accompanies it, rather than taxpayers thru FEMA and higher insurance premiums across the board, there will be less demand. The imperfect part comes from the fact that those higher costs will mean only wealthy folk will be able to live near the water.
 True. It won't limit construction. I mean, driving and car ownership are regulated. Air travel is regulated. Metal detectors are regulation. Entering buildings is often regulated. There could just be police enforcement. In many areas along shoreline you aren't even allowed to walk in areas. It seems code regulators could work with police and/or state regulators and DEPs to keep construction out.

 

On Topsail Island in North Carolina, all the lots on the northern end of the Island have been classified as "non rebuildable" by the local government.  If a house on this type of lot is determined to be too damaged or it's destroyed outright, you aren't allowed to rebuild it and the lot stays as open space.  


Clearly if there's a will to do this, there's a way.  Sadly the residents/builders/politicians have put up enough of a fight that NC is the only place I know of on the East Coast that actually has this regulation.  


rhw

I believe there are several places, including ocean front in NJ and NY, where if your house has been destroyed due to the weather (i.e. flooding etc) you cannot rebuild and the lot(s) remain as open space.


John
rhw said:
I believe there are several places, including ocean front in NJ and NY, where if your house has been destroyed due to the weather (i.e. flooding etc) you cannot rebuild and the lot(s) remain as open space.

 I don't believe it is mandatory in N.J.  


I favor a "two strikes" insurance program. First flood, you get to rebuild. Second flood, you get money to move or rebuild but insurance is non-renewable.




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